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Digital Humanities at Santa Clara University

A guide for SCU students, faculty, and staff about digital humanities initiatives at SCU and beyond.

Projects at Santa Clara

A list of current SCU Digital Humanities projects from across the entire SCU community is available on the SCU Digital Humanities Initiative website. 

A selected list is as follows:

Voyages and Castaways: Digital Collections at Santa Clara
This collection of rare materials from Santa Clara's Archives & Special Collections was digitized specifically for use by students in Michelle Burnham's Culture and Ideas courses. A future goal of this project is to add functionality, such as live text annotating. 

Mission Santa Clara Unearthed
Mission Santa Clara Unearthed is a collaborative project between students and faculty in the Department of Anthropology at Santa Clara University. Drawing on diverse lines of evidence -- archaeological remains, historical documents, and ethnographic information -- we aim to peel back the official history of Mission Santa Clara. 

The Stainforth Library of Women's Writing
The Stainforth Library of Women's Writing is a multi-institutional digital humanities project that recovers and studies the largest private library of Anglophone women’s writing collected in the nineteenth century, owned by Francis John Stainforth (1797-1866). The titles in the collection have publication dates that cover four centuries of literary history, and these works were published in North America, Europe, Asia, and Australia. The library features women poets, dramatists, non-fiction writers, composers, lyricists, editors, translators, journalists, printers, and artists. By digitizing Stainforth's library catalog manuscript and making it searchable, we draw critical attention to the extent of authorship and women’s writing in circulation in the nineteenth century. We also point to the fact that these authors and their texts, many of which are now rare or lost, at one time counted.