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PHSC 190: Public Health Capstone

This guide was created for PHSC 190: Public Health Capstone. Use this guide to help support your capstone project. If you have any questions about this guide or would like further assistance, contact Anna Yang at ayang3@scu.edu.

Public Health Capstone Research Guide

PHSC 190: Public Health Capstone

This illustration provided a 3D graphic representation of a spherical-shaped, measles virus particle, that was studded with glycoprotein tubercles. Those tubercular studs colorized maroon, are known as H-proteins (hemagglutinin), while those colorized gray, represented what are referred to as F-proteins (fusion). The F-protein is responsible for fusion of the virus and host cell membranes, viral penetration, and hemolysis. The H-protein is responsible for the binding of virions to cells. Both types of proteinaceous studs are embedded in the particle envelope’s lipid bilayer.

This illustration, provided by the CDC, is a 3D graphic representation of a spherical-shaped, measles virus particle, that was studded with glycoprotein tubercles. 

The capstone course is a problem based, project-oriented course for senior Public Health Science majors. This class will require self-initiated, collaborative, interdisciplinary, and integrative student work that represents your accumulated public health education in practice. Students will work collaboratively in teams on a current public health problem facing the local community. Students will characterize the problem, conduct fieldwork, analyze possible solutions, and present the results to local community stakeholders, including fellow public health classmates and faculty. Students will examine complex issues from diverse perspectives and employ a variety of analytical tools to create solution-oriented, evidence-based, and applied deliverables.