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Racial Justice Resources through the SCU Library

A guide to racial justice resources available in the Santa Clara University Library collections and beyond.

About this Research Guide

Racial Justice Resources through the SCU Library banner

This Research Guide was created to list resources regarding racial justice. This guide includes materials available through SCU's Library (books, videos, and databases) and some publicly-available resources (podcasts, digital humanities projects). 

Types of Resources in this Guide:

The resources listed in this Research Guide include materials from within the Santa Clara University Library holdings and the greater community. The types of resources are explained below:

Books in the SCU Collection - This page contains links to the catalog records of books that are available through the Santa Clara University Library. The listed includes both ebooks and physical books

Databases - This page contains links to academic databases that provide articles about social justice. Open access databases may also be identified here.

Podcasts - This page contains links to podcasts. Podcasts are audio programs that are available for online streaming or for download. These are essentially "radio shows" you can listen to through your computer or other electronic devices.

Videos - This page contains links to videos that were created by SCU or available through the library's streaming services.

Digital Humanities Projects - This page contains links to digital humanities projects from Santa Clara University and elsewhere.

Note: Pick-up service is currently available for physical materials for members of the SCU Community. Please visit the Pick-up Service page of the library's COVID-19 services guide for more information.

Statement from the University Library

The following is the Santa Clara University Library's Black Lives Matter Statement. You can also view the full statement on the library website at: https://www.scu.edu/library/mission/blm/

"We would like to start by recognizing that no statement is sufficient to acknowledge anti-Black racism, particularly when these responses, collectively, are coming far too late and only when prompted by such wide-scale unrest as we have seen over the past week. At the same time, we feel it is necessary to publicly acknowledge the pain, trauma, and fear of the Black community that the past week has surfaced once again. Black lives matter. We salute those who are expressing their right to free speech and demonstration.

We wish to articulate our commitment to addressing issues of oppression in our library and the broader field of librarianship. We recognize the multiple forms of oppression that impact our communities but would like to explicitly center this message around anti-Black racism. This does not detract from our commitment to addressing all forms of oppression and injustice. Libraries are built on the same foundation of white supremacy as all institutions in the United States. Academic libraries, in particular, as institutions within the broader institution of higher education, bear out this reality.

Our communities and institutions need systemic change to address anti-Black racism, equity, and justice. We are moving through a long and painful period of transition in the history of this country, and a more just and equitable future can only emerge if more and more people do hard work both at the individual and institutional level. This requires a long-term commitment to change. Over the past months our staff have engaged in strategic planning for the library, and we have firmly and explicitly centered equity and justice in this plan, which is nearing completion. Our plan's guiding vision is to create and apply a social justice model for our library. This commitment is infused throughout the strategic goals we are currently developing, which include learning and research, organizational culture, public service, and diversity in our collections. We are a long way from understanding what such a model would look like, but we are committed to the self-study and adoption of structural changes that support this commitment. As we work to re-imagine our institutions, including the library, we invite you to engage in this work with us. Though we will be reaching out to the campus community to comment on our plans, please feel free to reach out to either Lev Rickards or Nicole Branch, co-interim University Librarians with thoughts, suggestions, or questions."

Other Useful Research Guides

Please visit the Ethnic Studies Research: Introduction research guide for more information regarding conducting Ethnic Studies research. While the Racial Justice Resources guide serves to link to many resources, it is by no means a comprehensive source for understanding how to conduct research. The Ethnic Studies Research guide provides invaluable information regarding how to effectively search the recommended databases.

For information regarding the Ohlone, please visit the The Ohlone in Santa Clara research guide. The guide is organized by time period: pre-contact, mission era, and post statehood to the present; but, there is overlap of resources within each of these categories. It combines locally held resources at Santa Clara University Library with websites, electronic articles, and archival material held at the Smithsonian and other institutions to provide depth to the topic.

Additionally, the Office for Diversity and Inclusion has an extensive list of resources on their Racial Justice Resources page. 

A Work-in-Progress

Please note this guide is a work-in-progress. Resources are actively being added to each section. You can view when this guide was updated on the bottom left side of the page, where the text reads "Last Updated." Questions and comments regarding this guide can be sent to Summer Shetenhelm, Digital Collections & Scholarship Librarian, at sshetenhelm@scu.edu