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HIST 54/154: Modern India (Brillman)

Modern India

 undefined Welcome to SCU Library

My name is Kelci and I am your librarian. I am here to support your research.

I do not judge or grade you.

I'm on a knowledge accrual mission along with you.

I expect you to be an active participant in this mission of developing your research skills.

Let's make the most of our time together!

*Indian Independence Day and Mahatma Gandhi, Student Collages, 2015 (courtesy Flicker.com)

Class Padlet

Made with Padlet

Find It Challenge

It's a race to see which group can find the full text of all three citations!

Work with your group to find the full text of the following three citations.

Post the permalink to the class Padlet.

An Entire Book:

Mizuno, Kazuharu and Lobsang Tenpa. 2015. Himalayan Nature and Tibetan Buddhist Culture in Arunachal Pradesh, India: A Study of Monpa. Tokyo: Springer.

We know this is an entire book because it only supplies the basic info of author, date, title, place of publication, and publisher. It doesn't contain page numbers or another title.

  • For books, start with OSCAR and do a title search, e.g. Himalayan Nature and Tibetan Buddhist Culture.
  • If you don't see it there, click the Link+ button.
  • If it still isn't available, you can do an InterLibrary Loan.
  • It is rare to find a PDF of an entire book online, unless it's an old book no longer under copyright.

Chapter or Other Part of an Edited Book:

Keune, Jon. 2015. "Conditions for historicising religion: saints, regional identity, and social in western India, ca. 1600 – 1900." In History and Religion: Narrating a Religious Past, edited by Bernd-Christian Otto, Susanne Rau, and Jörg Rüpke, 227-239. Berlin/Boston: Walter de Gruyter GmbH.

We know this is a book chapter because there is a portion in quotes--the smaller part of the larger thing--and a title in italics following--the larger thing that contains the smaller thing. This is similar to a journal article, but the difference is that there is no issue or volume number, just the page numbers.

  • For book chapters, start with OSCAR and do a title search for the title of the book, not the chapter, e.g. History and Religion: Narrating a Religious Past.
  • If SCU has the book, it will be in print or electronic format. Click through to find the chapter in the ebook. To get the chapter from a print book, you have two options:
    • There is a scanner on the 1st floor if you want to scan the chapter yourself
    • Or you can submit an InterLibrary Loan book chapter request and wait for a Library staff person to do it for you.
  • If SCU doesn't have the book, you can try requesting the entire book through Link+ (look for the Link+ button in OSCAR), or you can submit an InterLibrary Loan book chapter request and SCU Library staff will ask someone at a different library to scan it for you.
  • Sometimes you can also find PDFs of book chapters on Google.

Journal Article:

Thejalhoukho. 2021. “The Sikkim–Tibet Convention of 1890 and the Younghusband Mission of 1904.” China Report 57 (4): 451–65.

We know this is a journal article because, like with the book chapter example, there is a portion in quotes--the smaller part of the larger thing--and a title in italics following--the larger thing that contains the smaller thing. It's different than a book chapter in that it has a volume number (57), an issue number (4), and pages (451-65).

For finding journal articles, you have a lot of options.

  • You can search the article title in OneSearch, e.g. "The Sikkim–Tibet Convention of 1890 and the Younghusband Mission of 1904," and then follow the PDF button or the Find it at @ SCU Libraries link.
  • Or, you can search the journal title in the Journals & Magazines tool, e.g. China Report, find the database that provide access, and go in and download the PDF.
  • If none of that works, you can try Google Scholar with the article title, e.g. "The Sikkim–Tibet Convention of 1890 and the Younghusband Mission of 1904,"
  • Finally, try a plain old Google search as a last resort. If you don't find it, an Interlibrary Loan article request is in your future!

Tools for Finding the Full Text

Use these tools to complete the Find It Group Challenges!

Many of the tools linked below are available through the front page of the Library's website, but the direct links are provided below.


 

OneSearch is a discovery tool you can use when starting your research.

However, you can also use it to help you find the full text by searching for the title of the book, book chapter, or journal article and following the links from there.


 

Use OSCAR for the title, author/editor, or other details of a book or journal. OSCAR does not contain journal articles or individual book chapters, so you would have to use the journal/book title or book author/editor name to find the larger container the article or book chapter is published in.


 

Use the title of the journal, magazine, or periodical to search, not the title of the article.


 

It is advisable to start with a search in OSCAR with the title of the book, album, or movie, and if SCU doesn't own it or if it's checked out/unavailable, look for the Link+ button. Above is the link directly to Link+ if you know SCU doesn't have it.

 


 

Interlibrary Loan, or ILL as librarians affectionately call it for short, is a portal where you can submit requests online for articles, books, and other materials SCU doesn't own or doesn't have available at the moment, and materials that aren't available through Link+.

NOW you can also use it to request book chapter scans and article PDFs that SCU owns -- a library staff person will get it for you and upload it to your portal. Super easy but getting it yourself might be faster if you're in a rush.


 

Google scholar is great and you will probably like using it, although it has its drawbacks. Make sure to set up your library account through the settings in your Google Scholar account to connect it with the Find it @ SCU Tool.


 


Find it @ SCU Libraries

This is not a tool to link to, but a tool embedded in most of the Library's databases, including OneSearch. Look for this text to connect to the tool that hunts down the link to the full text for you through the Library's subscriptions. It is also useful in that it will pre-populate the InterLibrary Loan Request Form if SCU doesn't have a subscription to your journal article.


 

Set up your Library tools

Try this to help next time.

Set up your Library tools.

Head over to your Interlibrary Loan account and login for the first time (if you have never logged in). You will be directed to fill out some basic information about yourself, which is a one-time thing.

Now, configure your Google Scholar account to show the Find it @ SCU library tool.

  1. Go to the hamburger button in the top left corner
  2. Select Settings
  3. Go to the 3rd tab, Library Links
  4. Search for Santa Clara University
  5. Install the Find It @ SCU tool